Thursday, October 8, 2015

Finalist of The William Faulkner – William Wisdom Creative Writing

KHANH HA's novella,“Mrs. Rossi’s Dream” from his new novel “In The U Minh Forest” (presently with his agent) is the finalist of The William Faulkner – William Wisdom Creative Writing novella category. An excerpt of the novella will be published early next year in The Double Dealer, the annual literary journal of the Pirate’s Alley Faulkner Society.

This novella was sought after earlier this year by Amazon Kindle Singles, its New York-based editors having expressed enthusiasm in launching it as a Kindle Singles.

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

The Silence of Knowing

"The year she turned seventeen Kim Ly met Annabella, a classmate of mixed racial parentage. She had brown skin and fuzzy black hair from her African American blood. Though her mother was Vietnamese, Annabella’s face had no Asian features. Her broad shoulders were particularly brawny when she wore a close-fitting shirt, and she loved tight shirts. She was taller than most girls in the class. In skirts with knee-high white stockings, her long legs loped in happy strides." [The Silence of Knowing, TAYO, Issue 5, 2015]

Monday, May 11, 2015

Another Realm

"From that moment he knew a rapist was no different from an opium addict, and a virgin girl, like Lan, was bch phiến ―heroin."--Another Realm, The Military Review, Spring 2015

Friday, May 1, 2015

Moon City Review

“Reading Khanh Ha's second novel, The Demon Who Peddled Longing, is like walking through a vivid painting of the Mekong Delta in southwestern Vietnam.

The theme of the reciprocity of benevolence between the characters endows the novel with a humanitarian perspective. Ha's adherence to a gritty and believable story world, paradoxically, emphasizes and reinforces this theme while at the same time providing a dramatic juxtaposition of the opposing tendencies within Nam to both save lives and take them. It is this unique quality of Ha's writing that makes the novel not only one that is difficult to put down, but also one that forces readers to examine their own internal confluence of thought through the presentation of Nam's struggles in an exotic and enigmatic landscape.”--Ryan Hubble, Moon City Review